My Blog

Posts for: July, 2014

MarthaStewartShowsOffRenovationWork-InHerMouth

Martha Stewart has built a flourishing career by showcasing the things she’s designed and made — like floral arrangements, crafts, and even home renovations. Just recently, she was showing off her latest restoration project: a new dental bridge. In fact, she live-tweeted the procedure from her dentist’s office… and she even included pictures of the bridgework before it was placed on her teeth!

OK, it’s a departure from paper crafts and home-made pillows… but why not? We can’t help feeling that there’s just as much craftsmanship — even artistry — in dental bridgework as there is in many other custom-made items. If you learn a little more about what goes into making and placing bridgework, perhaps you’ll understand why we feel that way.

Bridgework is one good solution to the problem of missing teeth (another is dental implants). A fixed bridge is anchored to existing teeth on either side of the gap left by missing teeth, and it uses those healthy teeth to support one or more lifelike replacement teeth. How does it work?

Fabricated as a single unit, the bridge consists of one or more crowns (caps) on either end that will be bonded or cemented to the existing teeth, plus a number of prosthetic teeth in the middle. The solid attachment of the crowns to the healthy teeth keeps the bridge in place; they support the artificial teeth in between, and let them function properly in the bite.

Here’s where some of the artistry comes in: Every piece of bridgework is custom-made for each individual patient. It matches not only their dental anatomy, but also the shape and shade of their natural teeth. Most bridges are made in dental laboratories from models of an individual’s teeth — but some dental offices have their own mini-labs, capable of fabricating quality bridgework quickly and accurately. No matter where they are made, lifelike and perfect-fitting bridges reflect the craftsmanship of skilled lab technicians using high-tech equipment.

Once it is made, bridgework must be properly placed on your teeth. That’s another job that requires a combination of art and science — and it’s one we’re experts at. From creating accurate models of your mouth to making sure the new bridge works well with your bite, we take pride in the work we do… and it shows in your smile.

If you would like more information about dental bridges, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Fixed vs. Removable Bridges” and “Dental Implants vs. Bridgework.”


By My Dentist
July 15, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   oral hygiene   floss  
NewOrleansClaimtoDentalInvention

Think of New Orleans, Louisiana, and what comes to mind? The sound of jazz pouring out from a nightclub in the French Quarter… the smell of shrimp boiling in a spicy gumbo… the fresh feeling you get after you’ve cleaned between your teeth with dental floss?

You may not know it, but besides its culinary charms and musical mojo, New Orleans has another claim to fame: It’s the historical home of dental floss. In the early 1800’s, a pioneering dentist by the name of Dr. Levi Spear Parmly recommended that his patients clean between their teeth with a silken thread. Long before the role of oral bacteria was recognized, it was Dr. Parmly’s belief that cavities were caused by foreign material on the tooth surfaces. But it took until nearly the end of the century for his invention to become available in handy dispensers. And the rest, as they say, is history.

Today, of course, we know much more about the causes and treatment of tooth decay. For example, we know that harmful bacteria in plaque — the sticky biofilm that builds up on your teeth in the absence of effective cleaning — release chemical substances that erode tooth enamel; this causes cavities (tiny holes in the tooth) to begin forming. We also know that while brushing alone helps remove plaque, it’s far and away more effective when combined with flossing.

Yet there’s one thing we’re still not sure of: Why don’t more people use dental floss regularly? Did you know that with careful attention to your oral hygiene, tooth decay is almost completely preventable? Plus, dental floss is now available in many different varieties: It’s no longer made of silk, but can consist of nylon or gore-tex thread; it comes waxed or unwaxed, round or flat… even flavored like mint or bubble gum!

So here’s our suggestion: Find a style of dental floss you like, picture yourself on Bourbon Street… and spend a few minutes flossing every day. Your teeth will say “merci beaucoup.”

If you would like more information about flossing and cavity prevention, please call our office to schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Decay.”